“Monster Challenge” award ceremony and exhibition opening
Oct
26
to Dec 19

“Monster Challenge” award ceremony and exhibition opening

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More details to come! Award ceremony for student winners of the Monster Challenge and opening of the exhibition, which displays all entries into the competition.

Challenged to realize their own dreams (just like Mary Shelley) of “The New Frankenstein,” members of the Washington University student community entered new works into one of two categories: written (including poetry, fiction, nonfiction and theater; 5000 word limit) and visual (including new media, experimental media, sound art, performance art, and design) as part of The Monster Challenge.

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“The Monster in the Library”
Nov
26
10:00 AM10:00

“The Monster in the Library”

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Exhibition opening! See how books published after Frankenstein’s initial 1818 release contributed to the "Frankenstein phenomenon." Exhibition created by students enrolled in the Medical Humanities course “Frankenstein: Origins and Afterlives,” taught by Corinna Treitel (History) and Amy Pawl (English).

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“Making Monsters: A Conversation and Reading with Victor LaValle”
Oct
31
7:00 PM19:00

“Making Monsters: A Conversation and Reading with Victor LaValle”

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Pre-lecture reception, 5:45 pm. Book signing to follow the lecture.

Distinguished Visiting Scholar Victor LaValle is the author of the The Changeling, a retelling of the classic dark fairy tale, and Victor LaValle’s DESTROYER, a comic book that marries the Frankenstein legend with Black Lives Matter.

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Performance: Richard O’Brien’s “Rocky Horror Show”
Oct
19
to Oct 28

Performance: Richard O’Brien’s “Rocky Horror Show”

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On stage October 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28

Newlyweds Brad and Janet have blown a tire. They abandon their car and stumble into the Edison Theatre – right into Frank N Furter’s castle in Transylvania. Here their naive notions of sexual identity will be forever changed. Just in time for Parent’s Weekend and Halloween, The Rocky Horror Show will put a sassy musical finish to Washington University’s Frankenstein@200 programming. Come on and do “The Time Warp” with us! 

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“Human as Alien: From Frankenstein to Ex Machina and Annihilation”
Oct
17
4:30 PM16:30

“Human as Alien: From Frankenstein to Ex Machina and Annihilation”

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N. Katherine Hayles, the James B. Duke Professor Emerita of Literature at Duke University, and Distinguished Professor Emerita at the University of California, Los Angeles

The enduring appeal of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein testifies to our fascination with human-nonhuman distinctions and the boundaries that delineate human from alien. Arguably cobbled together from parts salvaged from different human (and animal) corpses, Frankenstein’s creature defies clear categorization as either human or non-human; its uncanniness derives largely from this ambiguity. In the digital age, similar uncanniness clings to human-like artificial beings, modeled on human anatomies and brains but fundamentally not human in their origins and functionalities. Click event title above for more information.

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“We Must Save Frankenstein's Monster” / “We Must Kill Frankenstein” [The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein]
Sep
30
2:00 PM14:00

“We Must Save Frankenstein's Monster” / “We Must Kill Frankenstein” [The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein]

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Pre-event reception at 1:30 p.m. Performances and multidisciplinary lectures taking place on three evenings, Forum on The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein celebrates the 200th anniversary of the novel’s publication by contemplating its bearing today in the context of medical research, practice, and ethics. Each event begins with performance from the celebrated adaptation of Frankenstein by playwright Nick Dear, followed by different scholarly lectures. September 30, joint lecture: Amy Pawl, “We Must Save Frankenstein’s Monster” and Minsoo Kang, “We Must Kill Frankenstein.” Click event title above for more information.

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“Frankenstein, the Homunculus, and the Long History of Artificial Life” [The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein]
Sep
29
7:00 PM19:00

“Frankenstein, the Homunculus, and the Long History of Artificial Life” [The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein]

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Pre-event reception at 6:30 p.m. Performances and multidisciplinary lectures taking place on three evenings, Forum on The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein celebrates the 200th anniversary of the novel’s publication by contemplating its bearing today in the context of medical research, practice, and ethics. Each event begins with performance from the celebrated adaptation of Frankenstein by playwright Nick Dear, followed by different scholarly lectures. September 29William Newman“Frankenstein, the Homunculus, and the Long History of Artificial Life.” Click event title above for more information.

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“Shelley’s Frankenstein and Modern Medical Practice: A Family Story of Lobotomy” [The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein]
Sep
28
7:00 PM19:00

“Shelley’s Frankenstein and Modern Medical Practice: A Family Story of Lobotomy” [The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein]

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Pre-event reception at 6:30 p.m. Performances and multidisciplinary lectures taking place on three evenings, Forum on The Curren(t)cy of Frankenstein celebrates the 200th anniversary of the novel’s publication by contemplating its bearing today in the context of medical research, practice, and ethics. Each event begins with performance from the celebrated adaptation of Frankenstein by playwright Nick Dear, followed by different scholarly lectures. September 28Luke Dittrich“Shelley’s Frankenstein and Modern Medical Practice: A Family Story of Lobotomy.” Click event title above for more information.

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“Lobotomies, Pain Guns, and Shredded Data: Patient H.M. and the Ethics of Human Experimentation”
Sep
27
5:00 PM17:00

“Lobotomies, Pain Guns, and Shredded Data: Patient H.M. and the Ethics of Human Experimentation”

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Assembly Series Lecture.

Luke Dittrich is a national magazine award-winning journalist and contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine.

Dittrich will speak on his book, Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness and Family Secrets. Patient H.M. tells the fascinating and sometimes troubling true story of Henry Molaison, an amnesic who became the most studied human research subject ever. Dittrich explores of the history of memory science and raises urgent questions about the ethics of medical research and human experimentation.

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“Medical Ethics and Frankenstein’s Monster”
Sep
26
7:00 PM19:00

“Medical Ethics and Frankenstein’s Monster”

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Two hundred years ago, Mary Shelly's novel Frankenstein portrayed a dark fantasy—a man who succeeds in creating life. Dr. Franksenstein abandoned his monster only to be destroyed by it, and Shelly's tale vividly foreshadows many of the ethical, medical, and social challenges we confront today. Dr. Kodner addresses issues raised by stem cell research, care for the under-served and under-insured of our country, and the destructive power of prejudice and forced isolation.


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Parabola 2017: Frankenstein
Dec
2
1:00 PM13:00

Parabola 2017: Frankenstein

The Des Lee Gallery presents Parabola 2017: Frankenstein, an exhibition that will encourage cross-disciplinary investigations relating to the various issues raised in the book. How does Frankenstein relate to the idea of the "other" in sociological contexts? What are the book's influences on popular culture, art, and medicine? How does the "year without a winter" that is referenced in the novel relate to climate change and environmental issues? (Click title for more information.)

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Parabola 2017: Frankenstein
Dec
1
6:00 PM18:00

Parabola 2017: Frankenstein

The Des Lee Gallery presents Parabola 2017: Frankenstein, an exhibition that will encourage cross-disciplinary investigations relating to the various issues raised in the book. How does Frankenstein relate to the idea of the "other" in sociological contexts? What are the book's influences on popular culture, art, and medicine? How does the "year without a winter" that is referenced in the novel relate to climate change and environmental issues? (Click title for more information.)

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The Monster’s Library exhibition
Nov
27
to Mar 30

The Monster’s Library exhibition

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A Book Made of Books: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: The Monster’s Library, a special exhibit at Olin Library, celebrates the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Curated by students in IPH 450A: Frankenstein, Origins and Afterlives, the exhibit explores Frankenstein as a book made up of other books. Students have drawn on rare texts from the collections of Olin Library and the Becker Medical Library, including a valuable early edition of Frankenstein. (Click title for more information.)

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Frankenstein Double Feature: A Cinematic Celebration
Oct
20
7:00 PM19:00

Frankenstein Double Feature: A Cinematic Celebration

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The Program in Film & Media Studies and the Center for the Humanities offer a double feature of Frankenstein films.

7 pm:  Director James Whale’s camp classic Bride of Frankenstein (1935). The scientist (Colin Clive) sets about to build his lonely monster (Boris Karloff) a mate (Elsa Lancaster).
8:30 pm: Mel Brooks’ comedic masterpiece Young Frankenstein (1974). Dr. Frankenstein’s American grandson (Gene Wilder) visits his ancestor’s castle and is soon drawn into his own misguided experimentation. (Click title for more information.)

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CONFERENCE: Frankenstein at 200
Oct
13
8:30 AM08:30

CONFERENCE: Frankenstein at 200

The Frankenstein at 200 conference at Washington University brings together scholars from several universities and disciplines, including history, philosophy, fine arts, literature, Africana studies and performing arts. Our goal is to foster discussion on a range of topics broached in Frankenstein and still relevant today. (Click title for more information.)

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