PODCAST: The monster’s dilemma

PODCAST: The monster’s dilemma

In this episode of GradCast, we explore themes of morality, psychology, and ethics raised by a quote from Frankenstein's monster: "I could not understand why men who knew all about good and evil could hate and kill each other." Tune in to discover how these themes transcend discipline and research boundaries.

PODCAST: How to create a musical monster

PODCAST: How to create a musical monster

It’s been 200 years since Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein, the classic tale of creation gone wrong. In honor of the novel’s anniversary – and just in time for Halloween – three undergraduates at Washington University in St. Louis were each invited to bring his own brainchild into being: a piece of music, inspired by Frankenstein, to be performed by WashU’s symphony orchestra. In this episode of Arts & Sciences' Hold That Thought podcast, Cole Reyes, Andrew Savino, and Ethan Evans talk about their music, the creative process, and Frankenstein. 

MUSIC FOR FRANKENSTEIN

MUSIC FOR FRANKENSTEIN

Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” (1818) is one of the most influential artistic creations of the last two centuries.At 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 29, the Washington University Symphony Orchestra will present three world-premiere student compositions inspired by Shelley’s book in the 560 Music Center’s E. Desmond Lee Concert Hall.

VIDEO: Frankenstein’s monster in popular culture

VIDEO: Frankenstein’s monster in popular culture

Dr. Frankenstein and his monster weren’t always pop culture icons, but the book did strike a nerve almost as soon as it was published. In 1823, just five years after Frankenstein’s publication, the actor T.P. Cooke starred in the first dramatic adaptation of the work called Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein. This was the only adaptation of the work during Mary Shelley’s lifetime.